Last year I wrote a tutorial on how to re-tune music to A4=432Hz in foobar2000. This works well if you are only listening to music in foobar2000 but this is a real time effect and therefore the files themselves will not permanently be re-tuned. I have seen tutorials on how to re-tune music files in Audacity and the like but this is a rather time-consuming process.

I recently got a question how to export the re-tuned files with foobar2000, did some research and found out it is possible. This process will be very fast once you have created a profile for it, what’s better, even the ID3-tags will be saved. 🙂 Please note that if you go from one lossy format to another, the quality of the sound will decrease. Also remember to disable the SoundTouch plugin when you play back your re-tuned files, otherwise they will be tuned even lower!

For this part of the tutorial I assume you have followed the first part of the tutorial and that you already have foobar2000 with the SoundTouch plugin installed.

Downloads

To be able to use the converter in foobar2000 you need to download the encoder for the file format you wish to use. Below you will find links for the Lame MP3 encoder and the FLAC encoder.

Lame MP3 Encoder
FLAC Encoder (download the most recent FLAC bundle)

You should extract the bundle(s) to your program files folder, foobar2000 will ask for the converters later.

The first time you will do a conversion you need to create and save a profile that you can use later. Once you have created a profile the task of re-tuning and exporting your files will be quite easy.

Creating a preset (You need to do this only once)

1. Start foobar2000 and load some music files you want to re-tune. Select the files, right click somewhere on the selection and choose Convert / …

foobar-converter-setup

2. Choose the output format you want to use (you can also edit the quality settings). Click Back.

3. Set destination. You can leave the output path to “ask me later” or you can choose a folder where all of your exported files will be saved. Then you can click the … button to the right of the “name format” text box and choose the folder and file names you want (There is a preview window below that shows how the export will look). Click Back.

4. Click “Processing” and double-click the SoundTouch plugin in the list of available DSPs. Then click “Configure selected” and adjust the rate by -1.82% (like in the first part of the tutorial). Click Back.

5. Click somewhere in the Saved presets window so nothing is selected and click “Save”, name the preset “Re-tune to 432Hz” or whatever name you want and press Enter. You have now created a preset for the re-tuning process.

6. Click “Convert”. If it is the first time you are using an encoder, foobar2000 will ask for it’s location. You can browse to the location where you extracted the bundle for the encoder and click Open. The re-tuning process should now start.

Re-tuning and exporting

After you have created the preset you only need to select the files you want to re-tune, right-click and choose Convert / Re-tune to 432Hz. On a modern computer this process will take less than half a minute for a full album. A really nice thing about re-tuning your music this way is that the ID3-tags will be saved (at least according to my tests).

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9 Responses to Tutorial: Re-tuning music to A4=432Hz in foobar2000 part 2; exporting re-tuned files

  1. T TTTTTT says:

    Great work. THank you for this. You have made me very grateful and happy for this tutorial.

  2. Pat says:

    FAN

    TAS

    TIC.

    You’re an excellent teacher, Sir. Thank you!

  3. Karfi says:

    Problem, is it possible overwrite files in several folders and subfolders?

    • Mick says:

      It should be, if you select “Source track folder” as output path and “Overwrite” if file already exists. Have you tried that?

      • Karfi says:

        1 out of 1 tracks converted with major problems.

        Source: “C:\Dokumenty\My Music\Svatba\P!nk Sober.mp3”
        Unable to open file for writing (File is already in use) : “C:\Dokumenty\My Music\Svatba\P!nk Sober.mp3”
        Conversion failed: File is already in use

  4. Bernd says:

    Amazing. I’ve been experimenting with converting music back to 432Hz for years. I’m incredibly grateful for finally being able to have quality 432Hz music. Thanks a billion Mick!

    As for format and bit rate: would you recommend 24-bit wav above 320kbps mp3? Should I just stick with 16-bit?

    • Mick says:

      Glad I could help 🙂

      I think you should stick with 320kbps mp3, you will save space and the files will be more compatible with hardware players etc. Since the source files are already 16-bit (I assume) there is really no point converting them to 24-bit.

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